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Oming’s Kitchen
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Oming’s Kitchen

Where To Find Filipino Food in Las Vegas

Lumpia and halo-halo dishes to explore

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Filipino cuisine is a blend of colonial and cultural influences. With its roots in Indigenous culture, Filipino cuisine draws influences from a wide range of culinary traditions including Spanish, American, Japanese, Chinese, Malaysian, and Indian traditions. As such, the Filipino flavor profile is sweet, sour, and salty—a combination that’s complex yet inviting.

Signature dishes include lumpia (a variation on spring rolls), dinuguan (stew made with pig’s blood), pancit (simple noodles with toppings such as shrimp and eggs), and the always delightful halo-halo (a cheery dessert comprised of evaporated milk, crushed ice, sweet beans, ice cream, fruit, and other colorful toppings).

For diners in search of Filipino cuisine in Las Vegas, options range from fast-food favorites to modernist Filipino cuisine. Here is a selection of the city’s many Filipino restaurants:

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Kusina Ni Lorraine Filipino Fast Food & Asian Market

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Kusina Ni Lorraine offers a fast-casual dining option for those in North Las Vegas, checking off all the boxes of Filipino food cravings: lumpia, pancit, savory stews, and grilled meats. Additionally, the eatery doubles as an Asian mini-market, featuring staple Filipino ingredients, drinks, and snacks. Stock your home with Datu Puti Vinegar and Soy Sauce—a fundamental duo in both Filipino pantries and dishes—or, if you don’t feel like cooking, bags of chicharron—deep-fried pork rinds for snacking. 

Oming's Kitchen

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This food truck serves traditional Filipino street-style food. Chef Salome Pilas, who hails from the Philippines, may only offer seven items, but each dish shines. Some of Oming’s praised dished include her pork sinugba, pork belly that’s grilled and marinated in house barbecue sauce and served over a bed of Jasmine white rice, and the adobo, a diner’s choice of pork or chicken, that’s cooked in soy sauce, vinegar and secret spices, and served over rice. A restaurant opens in the southwest at Blue Diamond Road, just west of Decatur Boulevard, soon, but her food truck generally parks at UNLV.

Oming’s Kitchen
Oming’s Kitchen
Oming’s Kitchen

Fiesta Filipina Cuisine

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Fiesta Filipina Cuisine utilizes a turo-turo (“point-point”) ordering system, which means you point out what food you want as they simmer in steam tables. Your portions, be it adobo or pork sisig, are generously scooped onto a plate, alongside a dollop of steamed white rice. Fiesta Filipina’s turo-turo style makes service remarkably quick and casual, and its vast selection is perfect for those unfamiliar with Filipino cuisine. While you eat, unwind in the Filipino villa-inspired dining room and catch an episode of a Filipino soap opera on their—one of many—TVs. 

Kapuso Kapamilya

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Karaoke and lumpia? It’s a winning combination at Chinatown’s Kapuso Kapamilya. The intimate space is the site where both would-be rock stars and pancit canton, crispy shrimp, and Kamayan feasts are found.

HALO HALO FILIPINO KITCHEN

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Tucked in a run-of-the-mill food stall at the Grand Canal Shoppes, Halo Halo features a modest (but excellent) menu of Filipino staples, from small bites to grilled entrees—lumpia, adobo sliders, lechon belly, pork sisig. Halo Halo most famously serves halo-halo topped with candied coconut, jackfruit, coconut jelly, flan, and tropical ice cream, which can be ordered a larger size or with fruitier flavors. Those wanting a lighter dessert can try their turon, an eggroll-style wrap filled with sweet plantains and jackfruit.

Jollibee

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Filipino fast-food chain Jollibee—the ubiquitous to-go meal of Filipino childhoods—is most famous for its Chickenjoy (fried chicken) and Jolly Spaghetti (sweet sauce-topped spaghetti, loaded with sliced ham and hotdog), making quick and hearty meals. These meals, of course, are not complete without their desserts, such as halo-halo or peach mango pies. There are currently three locations in Las Vegas—in the Southwest, the Seafood City near UNLV, and Henderson.

Jollibee
Jollibee
Jollibee

Max's Restaurant

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Max’s Restaurant started in 1945 after World War II when Maximo Gimenez, a Stanford-educated teacher, befriended the American occupation troops stationed at Quezon City. Over the years, Max's Restaurant became known as "the house that fried chicken built." Popular items include the restaurant’s signature fried chicken, pork barbecue skewers, and sizzling beef stew.

Signature chicken at Max’s Restaurant
Signature chicken at Max’s Restaurant
Max’s Restaurant

D'Pinoy Joint

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At D’Pinoy’s, the most popular dishes all include a Filipino take on pork. The restaurant’s pork tonkatsu, deep-fried pork belly with banana ketchup, inihaw na baboy, grilled and marinated pork belly, and binagoongan fried rice, fried rice mixed with chopped pork, shrimp paste, and finished with mangoes and tomatoes on top, are all best sellers.

Calamari at D’Pinoy Joint
Calamari at D’Pinoy Joint
D’Pinoy Joint

Cafe de Manila

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Cafe de Manila is a friendly Filipino spot that offers weekday lunch specials, all-day karaoke, and, occasionally, local artist performances in a bright, cozy atmosphere. Located in Flamingo Village Plaza, the shop offers venue services for any occasion, whether it be a graduation party or corporate event. It also offers a generous selection of catering services. Take advantage of Cafe de Manila’s all-day breakfasts to feast day or night on their hearty longsilog—a marriage of sweet longaniza, eggs, and garlic rice. 

Full House BBQ

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For an innovative and stylish take on Filipino food, look no further than Full House BBQ. Pioneered by Chef Alex Irlandes—a chef turned culinary operations director at Las Vegas casinos—Full House BBQ provides a flashy, modernist approach to Filipino cuisine in a bistro-like environment, featuring hot pot-style pompano, sisig birria tacos, oxtail burgers, and Flaming Halo-Halo—a traditional halo-halo that is, as the name suggests, flambéed at your table.

Kusina Ni Lorraine Filipino Fast Food & Asian Market

Kusina Ni Lorraine offers a fast-casual dining option for those in North Las Vegas, checking off all the boxes of Filipino food cravings: lumpia, pancit, savory stews, and grilled meats. Additionally, the eatery doubles as an Asian mini-market, featuring staple Filipino ingredients, drinks, and snacks. Stock your home with Datu Puti Vinegar and Soy Sauce—a fundamental duo in both Filipino pantries and dishes—or, if you don’t feel like cooking, bags of chicharron—deep-fried pork rinds for snacking. 

Oming's Kitchen

Oming’s Kitchen
Oming’s Kitchen
Oming’s Kitchen

This food truck serves traditional Filipino street-style food. Chef Salome Pilas, who hails from the Philippines, may only offer seven items, but each dish shines. Some of Oming’s praised dished include her pork sinugba, pork belly that’s grilled and marinated in house barbecue sauce and served over a bed of Jasmine white rice, and the adobo, a diner’s choice of pork or chicken, that’s cooked in soy sauce, vinegar and secret spices, and served over rice. A restaurant opens in the southwest at Blue Diamond Road, just west of Decatur Boulevard, soon, but her food truck generally parks at UNLV.

Oming’s Kitchen
Oming’s Kitchen
Oming’s Kitchen

Fiesta Filipina Cuisine

Fiesta Filipina Cuisine utilizes a turo-turo (“point-point”) ordering system, which means you point out what food you want as they simmer in steam tables. Your portions, be it adobo or pork sisig, are generously scooped onto a plate, alongside a dollop of steamed white rice. Fiesta Filipina’s turo-turo style makes service remarkably quick and casual, and its vast selection is perfect for those unfamiliar with Filipino cuisine. While you eat, unwind in the Filipino villa-inspired dining room and catch an episode of a Filipino soap opera on their—one of many—TVs. 

Kapuso Kapamilya

Karaoke and lumpia? It’s a winning combination at Chinatown’s Kapuso Kapamilya. The intimate space is the site where both would-be rock stars and pancit canton, crispy shrimp, and Kamayan feasts are found.

HALO HALO FILIPINO KITCHEN

Tucked in a run-of-the-mill food stall at the Grand Canal Shoppes, Halo Halo features a modest (but excellent) menu of Filipino staples, from small bites to grilled entrees—lumpia, adobo sliders, lechon belly, pork sisig. Halo Halo most famously serves halo-halo topped with candied coconut, jackfruit, coconut jelly, flan, and tropical ice cream, which can be ordered a larger size or with fruitier flavors. Those wanting a lighter dessert can try their turon, an eggroll-style wrap filled with sweet plantains and jackfruit.

Jollibee

Jollibee
Jollibee
Jollibee

Filipino fast-food chain Jollibee—the ubiquitous to-go meal of Filipino childhoods—is most famous for its Chickenjoy (fried chicken) and Jolly Spaghetti (sweet sauce-topped spaghetti, loaded with sliced ham and hotdog), making quick and hearty meals. These meals, of course, are not complete without their desserts, such as halo-halo or peach mango pies. There are currently three locations in Las Vegas—in the Southwest, the Seafood City near UNLV, and Henderson.

Jollibee
Jollibee
Jollibee

Max's Restaurant

Signature chicken at Max’s Restaurant
Signature chicken at Max’s Restaurant
Max’s Restaurant

Max’s Restaurant started in 1945 after World War II when Maximo Gimenez, a Stanford-educated teacher, befriended the American occupation troops stationed at Quezon City. Over the years, Max's Restaurant became known as "the house that fried chicken built." Popular items include the restaurant’s signature fried chicken, pork barbecue skewers, and sizzling beef stew.

Signature chicken at Max’s Restaurant
Signature chicken at Max’s Restaurant
Max’s Restaurant

D'Pinoy Joint

Calamari at D’Pinoy Joint
Calamari at D’Pinoy Joint
D’Pinoy Joint

At D’Pinoy’s, the most popular dishes all include a Filipino take on pork. The restaurant’s pork tonkatsu, deep-fried pork belly with banana ketchup, inihaw na baboy, grilled and marinated pork belly, and binagoongan fried rice, fried rice mixed with chopped pork, shrimp paste, and finished with mangoes and tomatoes on top, are all best sellers.

Calamari at D’Pinoy Joint
Calamari at D’Pinoy Joint
D’Pinoy Joint

Cafe de Manila

Cafe de Manila is a friendly Filipino spot that offers weekday lunch specials, all-day karaoke, and, occasionally, local artist performances in a bright, cozy atmosphere. Located in Flamingo Village Plaza, the shop offers venue services for any occasion, whether it be a graduation party or corporate event. It also offers a generous selection of catering services. Take advantage of Cafe de Manila’s all-day breakfasts to feast day or night on their hearty longsilog—a marriage of sweet longaniza, eggs, and garlic rice. 

Full House BBQ

For an innovative and stylish take on Filipino food, look no further than Full House BBQ. Pioneered by Chef Alex Irlandes—a chef turned culinary operations director at Las Vegas casinos—Full House BBQ provides a flashy, modernist approach to Filipino cuisine in a bistro-like environment, featuring hot pot-style pompano, sisig birria tacos, oxtail burgers, and Flaming Halo-Halo—a traditional halo-halo that is, as the name suggests, flambéed at your table.

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