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Curry udon at Cafe Sanuki
Curry udon at Cafe Sanuki
Sam Abrams

11 Places To Find Fresh, House-Made Noodles in Las Vegas

Dinner and a (noodle) show

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Curry udon at Cafe Sanuki
| Sam Abrams

Noodles are comfort food, a meal we turn to when we need something easy and delicious. But for those that specialize in making them — hand-pulled, cut, or rolled — they can be a form that takes years to master. From udon to ramen to Chinese hand-pulled noodles, here’s where to find house-made, hand-pulled noodles all over Las Vegas.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Mian Sichuan Noodles

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Incredible restaurants are so prevalent in Chinatown that it can be hard to choose. If the day or evening calls for hand-pulled noodles, Mian Sichuan Noodles is a can’t-miss option that’s known for its spicy hot and sour noodles and hearty spare rib noodles. Entrees tend to be on the spicier side here, but the restaurant is happy to customize heat level.

Big Dan Shanxi Taste

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Tucked inside a supermarket, Big Dan Shanxi Taste serves up the chewy, thick noodles typical of Xi’an food. The cold sesame noodles are a particular favorite, especially on hot days when steamy noodle soups are less appealing.

Cafe Sanuki

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This Spring Mountain spot is known for its udon, which is available with curry, clams, cream sauce, spicy miso pork, and a host of other customary and unexpected ingredients. All noodle dishes are priced under $10 here, encouraging diners to order multiple dishes, share, and try new flavors.

Cafe Sanuki Cafe Sanuki/Facebook

Beijing Noodle No. 9

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Beijing Noodle No. 9 makes a pretty good first impression with its goldfish-adorned entryway and frosty white interior, but the real show happens in the kitchen. Thanks to an open kitchen, diners can watch chefs craft hand-pulled noodles at the Caesars Palace restaurant. The menu boasts Beijing zha jiang noodle, braised beef shank noodle soup, wok-fried shredded duck, and pickles with vermicelli along with a full menu of Chinese favorites.

Mr Chow

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The noodle show inside this white, neon-tinged restaurant at Caesars Palace is hard to miss — even for diners who didn’t order the noodles. Mr Chow’s nightly noodle shows, which feature lots of spinning, pulling, and general flare, tend to draw cheers from nearby tables. Those who want to see what all the fuss is about can order the Mr Chow noodles. Originally introduced at Michael Chow’s London restaurant in 1968, the noodles are topped with slightly sweet, slightly spicy minced meat and fresh cucumbers.

Shang Artisan Noodle

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This intimate space just minutes away from the Strip is known for its dual focus on classic hand-pulled noodle techniques and modern variations. Here, diners can watch chefs twist and pull noodles that are used in hot and cold dishes. Menu items include Peking wonton soup, stir-fried tomato and scrambled egg with noodles, and chicken sesame cold noodles. For just $1.50, diners can — and should — add extra noodles to every dish.

Shang Artisan Noodle
Shang Artisan Noodle
Shang Artisan Noodle/Facebook

The Magic Noodle

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Diners love watching chefs make the noodles at The Magic Noodle. This unassuming strip mall spot has bar seating that puts noodle-lovers just inches away from the hand-pulled noodle show. The resulting chewy, springy noodles are served stir-fried, in soup, or with sauce.

The Magic Noodle
The Magic Noodle/Facebook

The Noodle Man

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For diners in search of an inexpensive, casual, and filling meal, it’s hard to beat The Noodle Man. The restaurant’s signature Shanxi knife sliced noodle soup pairs beef, sweet potato and black fungus with vermicelli and the hot and spicy noodle soup features a salty, savory combination of pork and peanuts. The Noodle Man also serves stir-fried noodles, noodles over rice, and special creations.

Ramen KoBo

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Lots of ramen spots buy noodles from wholesalers, but Ramen Kobo is among those that make their own in-house. For the most noodle-centric experience, order the tsukemen, a style of ramen where thick noodles are served separately from the broth, meant to be dipped.

shàng miàn

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A seat at the counter at shang mian gives you the opportunity to watch the noodle makers stretch and pull the noodles here into perfect threads, before quickly cooking and bathing them in broth.

Ohjah Noodle House

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Locally loved Ohjah made a name for itself with its sushi and hibachi restaurants in Las Vegas and Pahrump, but the brand also has two noodle houses (one in Henderson and one in Rhodes Ranch). Diners will find ramen with oxtail, tonkatsu, shrimp, and other specialties along with stir-fried noodles and specialty dishes.

Mian Sichuan Noodles

Incredible restaurants are so prevalent in Chinatown that it can be hard to choose. If the day or evening calls for hand-pulled noodles, Mian Sichuan Noodles is a can’t-miss option that’s known for its spicy hot and sour noodles and hearty spare rib noodles. Entrees tend to be on the spicier side here, but the restaurant is happy to customize heat level.

Big Dan Shanxi Taste

Tucked inside a supermarket, Big Dan Shanxi Taste serves up the chewy, thick noodles typical of Xi’an food. The cold sesame noodles are a particular favorite, especially on hot days when steamy noodle soups are less appealing.

Cafe Sanuki

Cafe Sanuki Cafe Sanuki/Facebook

This Spring Mountain spot is known for its udon, which is available with curry, clams, cream sauce, spicy miso pork, and a host of other customary and unexpected ingredients. All noodle dishes are priced under $10 here, encouraging diners to order multiple dishes, share, and try new flavors.

Cafe Sanuki Cafe Sanuki/Facebook

Beijing Noodle No. 9

Beijing Noodle No. 9 makes a pretty good first impression with its goldfish-adorned entryway and frosty white interior, but the real show happens in the kitchen. Thanks to an open kitchen, diners can watch chefs craft hand-pulled noodles at the Caesars Palace restaurant. The menu boasts Beijing zha jiang noodle, braised beef shank noodle soup, wok-fried shredded duck, and pickles with vermicelli along with a full menu of Chinese favorites.

Mr Chow

The noodle show inside this white, neon-tinged restaurant at Caesars Palace is hard to miss — even for diners who didn’t order the noodles. Mr Chow’s nightly noodle shows, which feature lots of spinning, pulling, and general flare, tend to draw cheers from nearby tables. Those who want to see what all the fuss is about can order the Mr Chow noodles. Originally introduced at Michael Chow’s London restaurant in 1968, the noodles are topped with slightly sweet, slightly spicy minced meat and fresh cucumbers.

Shang Artisan Noodle

Shang Artisan Noodle
Shang Artisan Noodle
Shang Artisan Noodle/Facebook

This intimate space just minutes away from the Strip is known for its dual focus on classic hand-pulled noodle techniques and modern variations. Here, diners can watch chefs twist and pull noodles that are used in hot and cold dishes. Menu items include Peking wonton soup, stir-fried tomato and scrambled egg with noodles, and chicken sesame cold noodles. For just $1.50, diners can — and should — add extra noodles to every dish.

Shang Artisan Noodle
Shang Artisan Noodle
Shang Artisan Noodle/Facebook

The Magic Noodle

The Magic Noodle
The Magic Noodle/Facebook

Diners love watching chefs make the noodles at The Magic Noodle. This unassuming strip mall spot has bar seating that puts noodle-lovers just inches away from the hand-pulled noodle show. The resulting chewy, springy noodles are served stir-fried, in soup, or with sauce.

The Magic Noodle
The Magic Noodle/Facebook

The Noodle Man

For diners in search of an inexpensive, casual, and filling meal, it’s hard to beat The Noodle Man. The restaurant’s signature Shanxi knife sliced noodle soup pairs beef, sweet potato and black fungus with vermicelli and the hot and spicy noodle soup features a salty, savory combination of pork and peanuts. The Noodle Man also serves stir-fried noodles, noodles over rice, and special creations.

Ramen KoBo

Lots of ramen spots buy noodles from wholesalers, but Ramen Kobo is among those that make their own in-house. For the most noodle-centric experience, order the tsukemen, a style of ramen where thick noodles are served separately from the broth, meant to be dipped.

shàng miàn

A seat at the counter at shang mian gives you the opportunity to watch the noodle makers stretch and pull the noodles here into perfect threads, before quickly cooking and bathing them in broth.

Ohjah Noodle House

Locally loved Ohjah made a name for itself with its sushi and hibachi restaurants in Las Vegas and Pahrump, but the brand also has two noodle houses (one in Henderson and one in Rhodes Ranch). Diners will find ramen with oxtail, tonkatsu, shrimp, and other specialties along with stir-fried noodles and specialty dishes.

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