clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A black bowl of ramen with pork, black garlic, and sprouts on a dark wood table.
Black garlic ramen from Moko Ramen Bar.
Moko Ramen Bar

The Essential Ramen Restaurants in Las Vegas

A handy guide to 21 of the best ramen bowls in Las Vegas

View as Map
Black garlic ramen from Moko Ramen Bar.
| Moko Ramen Bar

Want great ramen in Las Vegas? All you need to do is head to Chinatown. Or not. In the past few years, the ramen scene in Las Vegas has elevated with some of the best bowls anywhere. Whether the desire is classic tonkotsu-style broth, miso broths, or even cold ramen, Las Vegas has a place for you; many even offer vegetarian options. Here, is a look at 21 of the best restaurants to order ramen in Las Vegas, all over the city from the southwest and westside, Chinatown, East Side, and even the southeast.

See something missing or want to add your favorite? Drop it in the comments with some details or hit up the tipline with more information.

Read More

Moko Ramen Bar

Copy Link

This westside spot is known for its customizable ramen choices that include three different noodle options, choice of tonkotsu, shoyu, or miso broth and toppings such as pork chashu, shrimp tempura, black garlic oil, tofu, and kimchi.

Tomi Ramen

Copy Link

Tomi is tucked away in an easy-to-miss location but its vegan and vegetarian bowls are warming, as is its Naruto, a bowl named for the cult-favorite anime. The rest of the menu displays a clear Korean influence (think bulgogi fries and kimchi-heavy rice bowls) plus a few sushi rolls.

Ramen Tatsu

Copy Link

Reopened in 2013 by chef Wayne Kageyama (who learned how to make ramen in Japan), Ramen Tatsu specializes in tsukemen ramen with the broth served separately from the noodles, a thicker soup base meant for dipping, and chewier noodles. Diners can also order fried or curry rice, kimchi, or seared chasiu on the Tatsu menu.

Monta Japanese Noodle House

Copy Link

Chinatown’s Monta serves kurume-style tonkotsu ramen served in a pork broth and soy sauce directly from Japan. Monta offers thin, unrisen noodle bowls, with common menu options of miso and shoyu ramen. Toppings include dried seaweed, takana mustard leaf, and shredded green onions. Cold noodle ramen is on the menu as well, made with pork charshu, tomatoes, egg, cucumber, and bean sprouts.

Ramen Sora

Copy Link

Created by Japanese chefs Tomio Takada and Yoshinari Ichise, Ramen Sora (meaning noodle house) first opened in Sapporo, Japan. Ramen Sora features miso ramen, but also offers shio or shoyu. Sora’s menu includes numerous topping choices for a diner’s ramen such as corn, butter, moyashi (bean sprouts), or extra curry sauce.

Ramen Hashi

Copy Link

Tokyo-style ramen, all made from scratch, comes at the hands of this ramen restaurant in Chinatown. Customers can watch the process inside the open kitchen. Shio (salt) or shoyu (soy) dishes are both created with a chicken-based broth, the tonkotsu with a pork-based broth, and the chashu don features braised pork with shredded seaweed and egg over rice. Extra toppings include $1 selections of bamboo, seaweed, and tamago.

Shokku Ramen

Copy Link

Shokku is famous for two things: its 24-hour schedule, and its Shinigami Challenge, which entails eating a triple serving of their Shinigami ramen in under eight minutes: three pounds of noodles, 24 ounces of broth, and the bowl's signature scalding hot toppings. Winners are added to the wall of champions and receive a $25 gift card. Or you could, you know, just enjoy your ramen.

Shokku Ramen/Official

Izakaya Go

Copy Link

Chinatown’s Izakaya Go is known for its late-night reverse happy hour from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. and its spicy poke ramen. Other ramen favorites include miso ramen, shoyu ramen, and tonkotsu ramen. Izakaya Go also serves udon and sushi plus sake, wine, cocktails, and Japanese beer.

Ramen Show 2

Copy Link

This is the second incarnation of Ramen Show, which closed its original southwest location and opened in Chinatown in 2021. From the owners of Izakaya Go, this spot is sought out for its spicy umami ramen, which also comes in a vegan version, tonkotsu shoyu, and tonkotsu miso ramen. The Tai ramen, made with red snapper broth, scallops, and chicken is also worth a try.

KoKoRo Ramen

Copy Link

KoKoRo Ramen’s fried Brussels sprouts served with chipotle mayo may be even more popular than the restaurant’s namesake dish, but that’s no reason not to try both. After devouring the addictive appetizer, diners can order ramen with chicken or pork broth and thin or thick noodles. Speciality ramens include basil tonkotsu ramen, vegetable ramen, and black garlic ramen topped with fried whole garlic.

Jinya Ramen Bar

Copy Link

Jinya Ramen Bar has pork, chicken, and vegetable broth options with a variety of topping choices such as fresh garlic, poached egg, or chicken wonton. Thick, thin, spinach, and gluten-free noodles are all available, as well as vegan ramen. Check out all of the their three area locations.

Ramen-Ya

Copy Link

Ramen-ya is a part of the hugely popular Ramen Katana-ya Group, originally based in San Francisco. The Vegas location inside the Grand Bazaar Shops serves lemon shio, shoyu, miso, and spicy miso ramen. It’s also a popular spot for takeout bento boxes.

Fukumimi Ramen

Copy Link

Small and mighty, the star of the show here is the eponymous fukumimi ramen, a pork-based ramen with thin noodles, seaweed, boiled egg, and an ample amount of pork chashu. Add corn, extra egg, extra chashu, or bamboo sprouts for an upcharge.

Hana Ramen

Copy Link

Yokohama-style Japanese ramen restaurant Hana Ramen serves both a popular meat lover ramen with pork belly, ground pork, pork back, and chicken broth, and a vegan miso ramen with spinach noodles and cabbage. Diners can also order the ominously named jigoku ramen (aka hell ramen), which is made with extra spicy miso, shoyu dare, and pork belly.

Umai Ramen

Copy Link

Decorated with comic book-style panels featuring the restaurant, Umai Ramen is a fun addition to Henderson’s ramen scene (located a short distance across Stephanie Street from the Galleria at Sunset). Umai’s bowls of ramen are reasonably priced, from classic options to “specialty” bowls includng kimchi, curry, black garlic, or “BBQ,” each prepared in a tonkotsu broth. Combo meals, which combine a bowl of ramen, salad, and sushi roll or appetizer are popular.

Black garlic ramen from Umai.
Umai Ramen

Ramen Kobo

Copy Link

This might be the best place to take ramen novices since the menu easily instructs diners to first pick their choice of broth between shoyu, tonkotsu, miso, or vegetarian; then their desired spice level ranging from original to fire; and finally, a choice of any extra toppings such as ground pork, bamboo shoots, or black garlic oil. Try the miso ramen with medium spice for the perfect amount of a delicious kick. This restaurant comes from the team behind local favorites Monta Ramen in Chinatown.

Ramen Kobo
Ramen Kobo
Ramen Kobo/Official

Ohjah Noodle House

Copy Link

From the team behind the southern Nevada sushi chain of the same name, Ohjah Noodle House dishes up typical variations of ramen such as miso and tonkotsu. The house special ramen, TanTan Men, a combination of bean sprouts, ground pork, egg, scallions, and seaweed, is a spicy must-try for newcomers.

Sojo Ramen

Copy Link

Chef John Chien Lee of Soho SushiBurrito and Soho Japanese Restaurant added ramen to his portfolio with the opening of this stylish spot in the southwest. Diners can order ramen a la carte or opt for an appetizer and ramen combination. Ramen choices include Sapporo butter miso, black garlic tonkotsu, and tskukemen dipping ramen with wood ear mushroom. Appetizers such as edamame, agedashi tofu, and garlic kale are all priced at $3.95.

Omoide Noodles & Bowls

Copy Link

Land tonkotsu ramen with chashu, kikurage, green onion, menma, and nori, go spicier, make it tonkotsu miso, or even order cold ramen at Omoide. Diners can even grab extra toppings such as ajitama (egg), menma (bamboo shoot), and more.

Enza Ramen

Copy Link

The self-proclaimed “World’s Best Ramen House” in Henderson serves ramen with customizable spice levels ranging from original to extreme. Signature ramen options include black soybean sauce and pork belly, tonkotsu broth with pork back rib, and vegetable broth with fried vegetables.

Noodles being pulled from a bowl of ramen
Enza Ramen
Enza Ramen/Facebook

Bone and Belly Ramen

Copy Link

The vegan coconut squash ramen is worth a visit even if you’re not vegan, but Bone and Belly has something for everyone. Its classic tonkotsu pork ramen is rich without being overwhelming, and the selection of tempura-fried vegetables, including wing-style maitakes, are perfect for snacking.

Loading comments...

Moko Ramen Bar

This westside spot is known for its customizable ramen choices that include three different noodle options, choice of tonkotsu, shoyu, or miso broth and toppings such as pork chashu, shrimp tempura, black garlic oil, tofu, and kimchi.

Tomi Ramen

Tomi is tucked away in an easy-to-miss location but its vegan and vegetarian bowls are warming, as is its Naruto, a bowl named for the cult-favorite anime. The rest of the menu displays a clear Korean influence (think bulgogi fries and kimchi-heavy rice bowls) plus a few sushi rolls.

Ramen Tatsu

Reopened in 2013 by chef Wayne Kageyama (who learned how to make ramen in Japan), Ramen Tatsu specializes in tsukemen ramen with the broth served separately from the noodles, a thicker soup base meant for dipping, and chewier noodles. Diners can also order fried or curry rice, kimchi, or seared chasiu on the Tatsu menu.

Monta Japanese Noodle House

Chinatown’s Monta serves kurume-style tonkotsu ramen served in a pork broth and soy sauce directly from Japan. Monta offers thin, unrisen noodle bowls, with common menu options of miso and shoyu ramen. Toppings include dried seaweed, takana mustard leaf, and shredded green onions. Cold noodle ramen is on the menu as well, made with pork charshu, tomatoes, egg, cucumber, and bean sprouts.

Ramen Sora

Created by Japanese chefs Tomio Takada and Yoshinari Ichise, Ramen Sora (meaning noodle house) first opened in Sapporo, Japan. Ramen Sora features miso ramen, but also offers shio or shoyu. Sora’s menu includes numerous topping choices for a diner’s ramen such as corn, butter, moyashi (bean sprouts), or extra curry sauce.

Ramen Hashi

Tokyo-style ramen, all made from scratch, comes at the hands of this ramen restaurant in Chinatown. Customers can watch the process inside the open kitchen. Shio (salt) or shoyu (soy) dishes are both created with a chicken-based broth, the tonkotsu with a pork-based broth, and the chashu don features braised pork with shredded seaweed and egg over rice. Extra toppings include $1 selections of bamboo, seaweed, and tamago.

Shokku Ramen

Shokku is famous for two things: its 24-hour schedule, and its Shinigami Challenge, which entails eating a triple serving of their Shinigami ramen in under eight minutes: three pounds of noodles, 24 ounces of broth, and the bowl's signature scalding hot toppings. Winners are added to the wall of champions and receive a $25 gift card. Or you could, you know, just enjoy your ramen.

Shokku Ramen/Official

Izakaya Go

Chinatown’s Izakaya Go is known for its late-night reverse happy hour from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. and its spicy poke ramen. Other ramen favorites include miso ramen, shoyu ramen, and tonkotsu ramen. Izakaya Go also serves udon and sushi plus sake, wine, cocktails, and Japanese beer.

Ramen Show 2

This is the second incarnation of Ramen Show, which closed its original southwest location and opened in Chinatown in 2021. From the owners of Izakaya Go, this spot is sought out for its spicy umami ramen, which also comes in a vegan version, tonkotsu shoyu, and tonkotsu miso ramen. The Tai ramen, made with red snapper broth, scallops, and chicken is also worth a try.

KoKoRo Ramen

KoKoRo Ramen’s fried Brussels sprouts served with chipotle mayo may be even more popular than the restaurant’s namesake dish, but that’s no reason not to try both. After devouring the addictive appetizer, diners can order ramen with chicken or pork broth and thin or thick noodles. Speciality ramens include basil tonkotsu ramen, vegetable ramen, and black garlic ramen topped with fried whole garlic.

Jinya Ramen Bar

Jinya Ramen Bar has pork, chicken, and vegetable broth options with a variety of topping choices such as fresh garlic, poached egg, or chicken wonton. Thick, thin, spinach, and gluten-free noodles are all available, as well as vegan ramen. Check out all of the their three area locations.

Ramen-Ya

Ramen-ya is a part of the hugely popular Ramen Katana-ya Group, originally based in San Francisco. The Vegas location inside the Grand Bazaar Shops serves lemon shio, shoyu, miso, and spicy miso ramen. It’s also a popular spot for takeout bento boxes.

Fukumimi Ramen

Small and mighty, the star of the show here is the eponymous fukumimi ramen, a pork-based ramen with thin noodles, seaweed, boiled egg, and an ample amount of pork chashu. Add corn, extra egg, extra chashu, or bamboo sprouts for an upcharge.

Hana Ramen

Yokohama-style Japanese ramen restaurant Hana Ramen serves both a popular meat lover ramen with pork belly, ground pork, pork back, and chicken broth, and a vegan miso ramen with spinach noodles and cabbage. Diners can also order the ominously named jigoku ramen (aka hell ramen), which is made with extra spicy miso, shoyu dare, and pork belly.

Umai Ramen

Decorated with comic book-style panels featuring the restaurant, Umai Ramen is a fun addition to Henderson’s ramen scene (located a short distance across Stephanie Street from the Galleria at Sunset). Umai’s bowls of ramen are reasonably priced, from classic options to “specialty” bowls includng kimchi, curry, black garlic, or “BBQ,” each prepared in a tonkotsu broth. Combo meals, which combine a bowl of ramen, salad, and sushi roll or appetizer are popular.

Black garlic ramen from Umai.
Umai Ramen

Related Maps

Ramen Kobo

This might be the best place to take ramen novices since the menu easily instructs diners to first pick their choice of broth between shoyu, tonkotsu, miso, or vegetarian; then their desired spice level ranging from original to fire; and finally, a choice of any extra toppings such as ground pork, bamboo shoots, or black garlic oil. Try the miso ramen with medium spice for the perfect amount of a delicious kick. This restaurant comes from the team behind local favorites Monta Ramen in Chinatown.

Ramen Kobo
Ramen Kobo
Ramen Kobo/Official

Ohjah Noodle House

From the team behind the southern Nevada sushi chain of the same name, Ohjah Noodle House dishes up typical variations of ramen such as miso and tonkotsu. The house special ramen, TanTan Men, a combination of bean sprouts, ground pork, egg, scallions, and seaweed, is a spicy must-try for newcomers.

Sojo Ramen

Chef John Chien Lee of Soho SushiBurrito and Soho Japanese Restaurant added ramen to his portfolio with the opening of this stylish spot in the southwest. Diners can order ramen a la carte or opt for an appetizer and ramen combination. Ramen choices include Sapporo butter miso, black garlic tonkotsu, and tskukemen dipping ramen with wood ear mushroom. Appetizers such as edamame, agedashi tofu, and garlic kale are all priced at $3.95.

Omoide Noodles & Bowls

Land tonkotsu ramen with chashu, kikurage, green onion, menma, and nori, go spicier, make it tonkotsu miso, or even order cold ramen at Omoide. Diners can even grab extra toppings such as ajitama (egg), menma (bamboo shoot), and more.

Enza Ramen

The self-proclaimed “World’s Best Ramen House” in Henderson serves ramen with customizable spice levels ranging from original to extreme. Signature ramen options include black soybean sauce and pork belly, tonkotsu broth with pork back rib, and vegetable broth with fried vegetables.

Noodles being pulled from a bowl of ramen
Enza Ramen
Enza Ramen/Facebook

Bone and Belly Ramen

The vegan coconut squash ramen is worth a visit even if you’re not vegan, but Bone and Belly has something for everyone. Its classic tonkotsu pork ramen is rich without being overwhelming, and the selection of tempura-fried vegetables, including wing-style maitakes, are perfect for snacking.

Related Maps