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A view of the Grand Canyon at sunset
The Grand Canyon
NPS/M.Quinn

Where to Eat at the Grand Canyon

From bison short ribs at the North Rim to fry bread tacos at the South Rim, here’s what to eat while you take in the views

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The Grand Canyon
| NPS/M.Quinn

You load up the car, get on the highway, and consume nothing but coffee until you’ve arrived. It’s the Great American Road Trip, and no place embodies the spirit of it quite like the Grand Canyon. The 277-mile-long, 6,093-foot-deep wonder isn’t just a destination, it’s the destination.

Visiting the Grand Canyon isn’t just as simple as looking at a map and going. You must first decide which rim: the bustling South Rim with its historic hotels and year-round entry? The remote North Rim with its otherworldly views and seasonal access? Or the touristy West Rim with its glass bridge hovering 4,000 feet above the canyon floor?

Once you decide where you’re going, here’s where you should eat when you get there.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

The Sky View Restaurant

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Unlike the south and north rims of the Grand Canyon, the West Rim is located on tribal land and is operated by the Hualapai Indians. It’s also the site of the alluring (or terrifying, depending on your opinion of glass walkways above canyons) Skywalk. Here, dining options have been scarce since the closure of the Sa’Nya-Wa’ restaurant, but the Sky View Restaurant satisfies road trip cravings with wings, burgers, hot dogs, and beer. The most notable feature here, however, is the view. The Grand Canyon and the Skywalk can be seen through floor-to-ceiling windows within the expansive dining room.

Wine glasses on a table near a window overlooking the Grand Canyon
Sky View Restaurant
Grand Canyon West

Brewed Awakenings Coffee Co.

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About an hour south of the Grand Canyon, road trippers will find the charming town of Williams, a quintessential national park gateway town with access to the Grand Canyon Railway. If you’re staying in Williams on your trip to the Grand Canyon, you can start your day by either stopping in or driving through Brewed Awakenings, a local coffee shop with lattes, frappes, breakfast burritos, and pastries that are perfect for enjoying on the drive or train ride to the South Rim.

Frozen yogurt with strawberries and blueberries
Brewed Awakenings Coffee Co.
Brewed Awakenings Coffee Co./Facebook

Maswik Pizza Pub

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If you don’t have the energy to change into nice clothes and sit down for a formal dinner after a long hike in the Grand Canyon, head to Maswik Pizza Pub, order a few slices — or a whole 16-inch pie — pair it with wings, bread sticks, and a draft beer, and then collapse for the night. Maswik Pizza Pub offers seating for those who prefer to enjoy pizza at an actual table, but ordering a supreme with pepperoni, sausage, ham, mushrooms, peppers, olives, and onions to be consumed in your tent is perfectly acceptable, too.

Arizona Steakhouse

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Situated in the Bright Angel Lodge, just steps away from the trail of the same name, the Arizona Steakhouse (formerly the Arizona Room) is a relaxed restaurant with a focus on locally sourced ingredients. Xanterra Parks & Resorts, the main concessionaire at the Grand Canyon, prides itself in sustainability (in fact, much of the vegetable scraps at the South Rim restaurants are fed to the area’s mules). Open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, the Arizona Steakhouse is known for its green chile corn tamales, Arizona prime rib, prickly pear glazed pork ribs, and selection of local beer, wine, and spirits.

Fred Harvey Burger

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The Grand Canyon is referred to as the Inverted Mountain for a reason. It requires hikers to do the easy downhill part first and the uphill part last, which can make for a confusing and exhausting day. A rewarding end to a challenging hike can be found at Fred Harvey Burger (formerly Harvey House House Cafe ). Located inside the Bright Angel Lodge, this casual restaurant serves lunch and dinner. Look for local beers from nearby Flagstaff, Williams, and Chandler and one-third pound burgers topped with unique ingredients such as peach bourbon chutney, poutine, hoisin ketchup, and fried avocado.

El Tovar Dining Room

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Perched on the South Rim inside the historic El Tovar, which opened in 1905 and boasts a balcony suite with Zane Grey-inspired decor, this restaurant is the only true fine dining experience in the national park. Here, diners can enjoy Southwestern fare, including chorizo omelets for breakfast and tacos with local Arizona beef and house-made fry bread for lunch. The dinner menu features a must-try roasted duck entree with plum demi-glace, an impressive wine list with a focus on Arizona vineyards, and an old-fashioned dessert cart.

Yavapai Tavern

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The words “dog-friendly” and “national parks” don’t usually go together (dogs are not permitted on trails in the national parks and are not allowed below the rim of the Grand Canyon), but if you’re into traveling with a four-legged companion, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to find the dog-friendly patio at Yavapai Tavern. Outfitted with fire pits so that it can be enjoyed year-round, the restaurant serves elk burgers with roasted poblano, vegan chili, create-your-own pizza, and rotating gelato selections. Live music and Arizona craft beer make for a lively experience with unbeatable scenery.

A pulled pork sandwich and a beer
A pulled pork sandwich at Yavapai Tavern 
Visit Grand Canyon [Official Site]

Phantom Ranch

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Whether you get there by mule, by raft, or by foot, there’s nowhere on earth like Phantom Ranch. Nestled at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, Phantom Ranch is the toughest dinner reservation to land in the park. You can make the effort by entering the online lottery, scoring an overnight stay, and hiking or riding a mule down the 10-mile Bright Angel Trail or 7.7-mile South Kaibab Trail. Once you arrive at Phantom Ranch, you’ll be greeted with a dinner of steak, cornbread, and potatoes; beef stew; or vegetable chili. Breakfast includes scrambled eggs, hotcakes, cherrywood-smoked bacon, and enough coffee to motivate you to hike back to civilization.

A cabin at the Grand Canyon
The historic Phantom Ranch structure
Grand Canyon Lodges, South Rim/Facebook

Grand Canyon Lodge - North Rim

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As a result of its isolated location and mid-May through November season, the North Rim of the Grand Canyon makes up just 10 percent of park visitation numbers. Situated at 8,297 feet and offering unparalleled views of the canyon, the Grand Canyon Lodge, which is the only hotel on the North Rim, is the site of the Main Lodge Dining Room. The menu can change seasonally, but there’s always a focus on regionally inspired cuisine — venison meatloaf, bison short ribs, elk chili, and salads made with local produce.

Karma Sushi Bar & Grill

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Employees who work at the Grand Canyon are willing to make the hour-and-a-half drive for good sushi. If your need for spicy tuna can’t be measured in miles either, do as the locals do and head to Karma in Flagstaff for happy hour from 3 to 6 p.m. The restaurant serves specialty rolls, sashimi, ramen tempura, and other classic Japanese dishes. Happy hour specials include sake and martini specials plus discounted spring rolls, salmon nigiri, and gyoza.

A sushi roll
A saucy roll at Karma Sushi Bar 
Karma Sushi Bar/Facebook

Cameron Trading Post and Restaurant

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Southwestern fare isn’t just about prickly pear margaritas and Hatch chiles; it’s also about Navajo cuisine. Travelers entering the Grand Canyon from the east will find just that at Cameron Trading Post. The restaurant, motel, and gift shop is a great lunchtime stop that serves massive versions of the delicious (if controversial) Navajo tacos — fry bread loaded with ground beef, beans, and green chile — plus other specialties including Yah-Ahtay chile made with sirloin and pinto beans and fry bread topped with roast beef, gravy, and onions.

The Sky View Restaurant

Unlike the south and north rims of the Grand Canyon, the West Rim is located on tribal land and is operated by the Hualapai Indians. It’s also the site of the alluring (or terrifying, depending on your opinion of glass walkways above canyons) Skywalk. Here, dining options have been scarce since the closure of the Sa’Nya-Wa’ restaurant, but the Sky View Restaurant satisfies road trip cravings with wings, burgers, hot dogs, and beer. The most notable feature here, however, is the view. The Grand Canyon and the Skywalk can be seen through floor-to-ceiling windows within the expansive dining room.

Wine glasses on a table near a window overlooking the Grand Canyon
Sky View Restaurant
Grand Canyon West

Brewed Awakenings Coffee Co.

About an hour south of the Grand Canyon, road trippers will find the charming town of Williams, a quintessential national park gateway town with access to the Grand Canyon Railway. If you’re staying in Williams on your trip to the Grand Canyon, you can start your day by either stopping in or driving through Brewed Awakenings, a local coffee shop with lattes, frappes, breakfast burritos, and pastries that are perfect for enjoying on the drive or train ride to the South Rim.

Frozen yogurt with strawberries and blueberries
Brewed Awakenings Coffee Co.
Brewed Awakenings Coffee Co./Facebook

Maswik Pizza Pub

If you don’t have the energy to change into nice clothes and sit down for a formal dinner after a long hike in the Grand Canyon, head to Maswik Pizza Pub, order a few slices — or a whole 16-inch pie — pair it with wings, bread sticks, and a draft beer, and then collapse for the night. Maswik Pizza Pub offers seating for those who prefer to enjoy pizza at an actual table, but ordering a supreme with pepperoni, sausage, ham, mushrooms, peppers, olives, and onions to be consumed in your tent is perfectly acceptable, too.

Arizona Steakhouse

Situated in the Bright Angel Lodge, just steps away from the trail of the same name, the Arizona Steakhouse (formerly the Arizona Room) is a relaxed restaurant with a focus on locally sourced ingredients. Xanterra Parks & Resorts, the main concessionaire at the Grand Canyon, prides itself in sustainability (in fact, much of the vegetable scraps at the South Rim restaurants are fed to the area’s mules). Open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, the Arizona Steakhouse is known for its green chile corn tamales, Arizona prime rib, prickly pear glazed pork ribs, and selection of local beer, wine, and spirits.

Fred Harvey Burger

The Grand Canyon is referred to as the Inverted Mountain for a reason. It requires hikers to do the easy downhill part first and the uphill part last, which can make for a confusing and exhausting day. A rewarding end to a challenging hike can be found at Fred Harvey Burger (formerly Harvey House House Cafe ). Located inside the Bright Angel Lodge, this casual restaurant serves lunch and dinner. Look for local beers from nearby Flagstaff, Williams, and Chandler and one-third pound burgers topped with unique ingredients such as peach bourbon chutney, poutine, hoisin ketchup, and fried avocado.

El Tovar Dining Room

Perched on the South Rim inside the historic El Tovar, which opened in 1905 and boasts a balcony suite with Zane Grey-inspired decor, this restaurant is the only true fine dining experience in the national park. Here, diners can enjoy Southwestern fare, including chorizo omelets for breakfast and tacos with local Arizona beef and house-made fry bread for lunch. The dinner menu features a must-try roasted duck entree with plum demi-glace, an impressive wine list with a focus on Arizona vineyards, and an old-fashioned dessert cart.

Yavapai Tavern

The words “dog-friendly” and “national parks” don’t usually go together (dogs are not permitted on trails in the national parks and are not allowed below the rim of the Grand Canyon), but if you’re into traveling with a four-legged companion, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to find the dog-friendly patio at Yavapai Tavern. Outfitted with fire pits so that it can be enjoyed year-round, the restaurant serves elk burgers with roasted poblano, vegan chili, create-your-own pizza, and rotating gelato selections. Live music and Arizona craft beer make for a lively experience with unbeatable scenery.

A pulled pork sandwich and a beer
A pulled pork sandwich at Yavapai Tavern 
Visit Grand Canyon [Official Site]

Phantom Ranch

Whether you get there by mule, by raft, or by foot, there’s nowhere on earth like Phantom Ranch. Nestled at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, Phantom Ranch is the toughest dinner reservation to land in the park. You can make the effort by entering the online lottery, scoring an overnight stay, and hiking or riding a mule down the 10-mile Bright Angel Trail or 7.7-mile South Kaibab Trail. Once you arrive at Phantom Ranch, you’ll be greeted with a dinner of steak, cornbread, and potatoes; beef stew; or vegetable chili. Breakfast includes scrambled eggs, hotcakes, cherrywood-smoked bacon, and enough coffee to motivate you to hike back to civilization.

A cabin at the Grand Canyon
The historic Phantom Ranch structure
Grand Canyon Lodges, South Rim/Facebook

Grand Canyon Lodge - North Rim

As a result of its isolated location and mid-May through November season, the North Rim of the Grand Canyon makes up just 10 percent of park visitation numbers. Situated at 8,297 feet and offering unparalleled views of the canyon, the Grand Canyon Lodge, which is the only hotel on the North Rim, is the site of the Main Lodge Dining Room. The menu can change seasonally, but there’s always a focus on regionally inspired cuisine — venison meatloaf, bison short ribs, elk chili, and salads made with local produce.

Karma Sushi Bar & Grill

Employees who work at the Grand Canyon are willing to make the hour-and-a-half drive for good sushi. If your need for spicy tuna can’t be measured in miles either, do as the locals do and head to Karma in Flagstaff for happy hour from 3 to 6 p.m. The restaurant serves specialty rolls, sashimi, ramen tempura, and other classic Japanese dishes. Happy hour specials include sake and martini specials plus discounted spring rolls, salmon nigiri, and gyoza.

A sushi roll
A saucy roll at Karma Sushi Bar 
Karma Sushi Bar/Facebook

Cameron Trading Post and Restaurant

Southwestern fare isn’t just about prickly pear margaritas and Hatch chiles; it’s also about Navajo cuisine. Travelers entering the Grand Canyon from the east will find just that at Cameron Trading Post. The restaurant, motel, and gift shop is a great lunchtime stop that serves massive versions of the delicious (if controversial) Navajo tacos — fry bread loaded with ground beef, beans, and green chile — plus other specialties including Yah-Ahtay chile made with sirloin and pinto beans and fry bread topped with roast beef, gravy, and onions.

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