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A bowl filled with macaroni and lobster.
Stanton Social Prime.
Caesars Entertainment

The 38 Essential Restaurants in Las Vegas

A guide to the best restaurants in Las Vegas for any culinary option, featuring must-visit neighborhood haunts, late-night dining destinations, and the city’s best tacos

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Stanton Social Prime.
| Caesars Entertainment

Welcome to the Eater 38, the answer to any question that begins, “Can you recommend a restaurant?” This group of essential restaurants covers the entire city, spans myriad cuisines and price points, and collectively satisfies all dining needs, from where to go for a reliable quick bite to the best splurge meal. Each quarter, the list is updated to include restaurants that have newly become eligible (restaurants must be open at least six months), those that have reshaped their approach in a significant way, and others that reflect the culinary dynamism that Vegas and its surrounding suburbs have to offer.

For the hottest restaurants that opened in the past six months in Las Vegas, readers can head over to the Eater Vegas Heatmap, updated monthly. This update includes the new Summerlin eatery Fine Company, the maximalist Stanton Social Prime, and quick-service burger stand, No Pants. Wing Lei, La Strega, and Boom Bang are still worth visiting — but are departing the list.

See something missing or want to add your favorite? Hit up the tipline.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process. If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Carson Kitchen

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In a modern restaurant with an al fresco rooftop and a rock and roll sensibility reminiscent of its founder, the late celebrity chef Kerry Simon, this downtown restaurant shakes up the menu seasonally, exploring new ways to play with comfort foods. Reliable mainstays include a cast iron skillet filled with sweet and smoky bacon jam and a slice of melted Havarti, ready to be scooped onto toasted slices of baguette. Perfectly cubed bites of pork belly are standouts in a pool of ocher buffalo sauce. And you can’t go wrong with the signature appetizer of crispy chicken skins with smoky honey.

Honey Salt

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Honey Salt on the west side could pass for the dining room at restaurateur Elizabeth Blau and chef Kim Canteenwalla’s home with its comfort foods and relaxing decor. Known for its farm-to-table-inspired cooking, favorites here include the buttermilk fried chicken sandwich and bacon grilled cheese for lunch and banana foster french toast with almond granola and chocolate pearls for brunch. Stop in during happy hour, when the chicken sandwich is available as a slider for $6. 

A basket of fried chicken next to a bowl of mac ‘n’ cheese and a bowl of cole slaw.
Fried chicken at Honey Salt
Honey Salt/

Tacos El Gordo

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If the lines outside Tacos El Gordo are any indication, the wildly popular tacos are still one of the can’t-miss experiences in Las Vegas. What the cafeteria-style restaurant lacks in ambiance, it more than makes up for in flavor. Each of the Tijuana-style tacos here is bursting with spice and texture. Arrive hungry and sample a few varieties, each about $3.50, by queueing separately for each kind of meat. In one line, order carne asada. In another, ask for extra pineapple to go with the al pastor. Mulas, with cheese melted between the taco’s two corn tortillas are also worth ordering. Bring cash for tipping both at the counter when orders are placed and when paying.

An array of tacos and drinks at Tacos El Gordo
Tacos El Gordo.
Tacos El Gordo

Esther's Kitchen

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Esther’s Kitchen was one of the first successful restaurants to debut in the Las Vegas Arts District, hailing a new era for the neighborhood as a culinary destination. The Italian restaurant, named for chef and restaurateur James Trees’ great aunt Esther, is small but cozy, a frequent haunt among locals. You have to pay for the bread here — and for good reason. Trees’ sourdough loaves are hearty and crusty, just right for slathering with spreads like basil ricotta and delightfully salty anchovy butter. But the real draw is the pasta. Take the butternut squash tortellini, tossed with brown butter and a hint of espresso for a richness that just works. In a dish of pasta al zucco, pumpkin-shaped noodles scoop up spicy bites of pork sausage and broccoli rabe.

A half-loaf of sourdough bread with ramekins of toppings.
Esther’s Kitchen
Esther’s Kitchen

Main St. Provisions

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Main St. Provisions introduces exceptional takes on familiar comfort dishes like oven-roasted chicken with braised greens and creamy polenta. Standouts include a cut of duck breast resting on toasted farro and blackberry barbecue sauce, a plate of fry bread and dips — like that of savory white bean, and crisp and toothsome broccolini. The result is a thoroughly approachable restaurant, just right for the booming walkable neighborhood of the Arts District.

Fine Company

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Chef Roy Ellamar is a veteran of Las Vegas Strip kitchens, most recently at Harvest by Roy Ellamar inside the Bellagio. His newest restaurant is off-Strip, in Downtown Summerlin. Here, he dabbles in New American cuisine, influenced by his life journey as a Filipino American born in Hawai’i. His small loaves of banana bread are a must with any breakfast or lunch. And dinner calls for soft, rich-flavored dates stuffed with savory lamb sausage and a Jidori fried chicken sandwich swathed in a honey cumin glaze.

Chef Roy Ellemar poses at Fine Company.
Fine Company.
Louiie Victa

Herbs and Rye

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With barely-there lighting, red and black damask wallpaper, and a bar stocked with a veritable century’s worth of cocktail fixins, Nectaly Mendoza’s off-Strip steakhouse and bar feels at once like both a romantic date spot and 1920s speakeasy. Whether dining at a table or at the bar, the move here is to order steak. Happy hour runs from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and after midnight — though sometimes it’s all-day, which means your steaks, pork chops, and spicy mussels are likely to be half-priced no matter when you stop in. The cocktail menu here is broken up by decade so you can start with something like a gin-based Martinez from the Gothic Age, follow up with a Hemingway daiquiri from the Prohibition era, and enjoy a painkiller from the tiki boom with dessert. 

Bazaar Meat by José Andrés

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José Andrés went all out with his steakhouse at Sahara Las Vegas with Candace Ochoa at the helm of the kitchen. A raw bar with ceviches and carpaccios and a fire stage with wood grills and rotisseries make Bazaar Meat more than a standard steakhouse. Fan-favorite dishes include the cotton candy foie gras, caviar flights, and Kobe beef (Bazaar is one of a handful of spots in Vegas that serve the real deal), which can be grilled on an ishiyaki stone at the table or served in a miniature airbread “sandwich” on the specials menu.

Austere pieces of Kobe beef cooking on a hot plate, tableside.
Kobe at Bazaar Meat.
Bazaar Meat

Balla Italian Soul

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With touches of coastal Italy and a menu of light and flavorful pasta, chef Shawn McClain’s Italian restaurant inside the Sahara celebrates all things pasta, pizza, and Aperol spritzes. His Roman-style pizzas incorporate the crust that McClain developed when he was running Five50 Pizza Bar, also at Aria. And Balla’s pasta dishes, like the casarecce — a dish of chewy noodles in a tangy sauce brimming with tomatoes, garlic, and Calabrian pepper — draw on flavors that are bright, vibrant, sometimes citrusy, and often a little spicy.

A the bar at Balla Italian Soul with spirits shelved inside blue arches.
Balla Italian Soul.
Balla Italian Soul

THE Steak House

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Despite the Steak House’s location within one of the least glamorous casinos on the Strip and its woefully uninspired name, The Steak House has endured as a popular restaurant in Las Vegas for more than 30 years — and rightfully so. Classic dishes include a stellar French onion soup, loaded with cheese and croutons and exceptionally prepared cuts of New York Strip, porterhouse, ribeye, filet mignon, and prime rib. The sweet smell of the mesquite grill wafts through the restaurant, as does the music of Frank Sinatra and his contemporaries. And with dark wood paneling, deep red banquettes, and the ambiance of the 54-year-old Circus Circus casino, it’s about as classic Vegas as it gets. 

Nicole Brisson, a James Beard Award semifinalist for Best Chef Southwest, teamed up with Jason Rocheleau, an alum of Wolfgang Puck Fine Dining Group, to open Brezza at Resorts World, an Eater Vegas 2022 Eater Award winner for Restaurant of the Year for its hand-made pasta, breezy dining room and fragrant pockets of cappellacci “oreganata.” The coastal Italian restaurant sits in the District, the 70,000-square-foot shopping center at the front of the resort facing Las Vegas Boulevard. The menu spans antipasti, fresh crudo, handmade pastas, and a Tuscan-style wood-fired grill, where sustainable seafood, dry-aged steaks, and  seasonal produce are all charred over white oak and olive branches.

A steak on a white plate and two cocktails
Dry-aged rib-eye steak, a classic Negroni, and mezcal Negroni at Brezza.
Louiie Victa/Eater Vegas

Peppermill Restaurant

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Every city needs a good diner, and the Peppermill with its neighboring Fireside Lounge, all wrapped in neon nostalgia on the north Strip, fulfills that need. The 14-page menu runs the gamut from omelets and French toast to burgers and steaks. And atmosphere is available in spades — from the mirrored walls to the indoor artificial trees to the shakers of pretty rainbow sprinkles available at every table. No trip here is complete without a trip to the Fireside Lounge with its kitschy fire pit, enormous cocktails with equally proportioned bendy straws, and electric pink, blue, and violet decor.

An omelet next to hash browns, on a white plate, next to orange juice.
An omelet at the Peppermill.
Peppermill

Edo Gastro Tapas & Wine

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Tucked behind a nondescript storefront in a Chinatown strip mall, Edo Tapas & Wine serves savory dishes inside a moody, chandelier-illumined dining room. Chef Oscar Amador Edo grew up in Barcelona, Spain and brings his own approach to tapas with hot and cold dishes, charcuterie, and a rotating tasting menu. Order a bikini, a pressed sandwich with sobrasada and Mahon cheese, as well as a 30-day dry-aged striploin carpaccio with puri bread, and “textures of artichokes,” an exploration of the vegetable done three ways. 

An artful plate of beef tartare with large rosemary sprigs and edible flowers. 
Washugyu beef tartare at Edo Gastro Tapas & Wine.
Edo Gastro Tapas & Wine/Eater Vegas

Kaiseki Yuzu

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Kaoru Azeuchi was tapped as a finalist for a James Beard Award this year for his intricate dishes and thoughtfully coursed menus at Kaiseki Yuzu. Inside the open kitchen and at the sushi bar, Azeuchi specializes in omakase dinners that highlight technique and ingredients with ornate presentations and artful slices of sashimi. Seasonal fish is handpicked for every service. Azeuchi wraps seared king mackerel in lettuce and layers it with caviar and uni sauce. He grills A5 wagyu steak ribeye and plates it with winter truffles, foie gras, and vegetables.

Delilah

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The long-awaited Delilah, the breathtaking supper club from H.Wood Group at Wynn Las Vegas, features a two-level space with lavish chandeliers, a fireplace, and entertainers dancing alongside a live jazz band. Executive chef Josh Smith’s take on refined American fare includes Wagyu beef Wellington, a reinvented — and high-end — chicken TV dinner, and Dover sole fish and chips with pommes soufflé. The decadence extends to the desserts, where a strawberry shortcake baked Alaska leads the way.

A sliced beef Wellington on an oval white plate with hands holding a slice in two knives
Wagyu beef Wellington at Delilah.
Bill Milne

Yui Edomae

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One of the most impressive sushi experiences in Chinatown starts at Yui Edomae. The edomae sushi restaurant from chef Gen Mizoguchi, who changed the sushi game in Vegas when he opened his lauded Kabuto, features three sophisticated high-end omakase menus, ranging from $180 to $290. The omakase is prepared and served in a simple, intimate dining room where dishes of nigiri and sashimi — unburdened by sauces or heavy flavors — are the star. Standouts include uni nigiri with a dab of hand-grated wasabi, buttery bites of salmon and very very fatty tuna.

A spare-looking pair of plates holding six pieces of sushi, next to bowls holding salt and soy sauce.
Yui Edomae Sushi.
Yui Edomae Sushi

Aburiya Raku

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Every chef in town stops by Mitsuo Endo’s tiny restaurant in Chinatown for small-portioned Japanese robata dishes cooked over a charcoal grill. Diners can order a variety of items since most start at $3, or try the omakase with a flight of food chosen by the chef for $75 to $100. Inside the moody restaurant with sleek metallic details, order the agedashi tofu with salmon roe and a vinegary dipping sauce. The green tea soba noodles with poached egg and bonito flakes are texturally satisfying and the hot skewered yellowtail is seasoned in all the right ways.

A large piece of salmon on two skewers, with Ikura on a bed of rice
Salmon with Ikura Oroshi at Raku.
Raku

FukuBurger

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Colin Fukunaga’s Japanese-influenced burgers, which gained something of a cult following when only available by food truck, now have a permanent home in Chinatown and in the southwest. Located in what used to be a Taco Bell (the 90s-style kind with the three archways), the counter-service restaurant has been retrofitted with a red and gray color palette and graphic stickers. Visitors should try the namesake FukuBurger, aka the “Lucky” burger, with an all-beef patty with American cheese topped with lettuce, tomato, onions, wasabi mayo, and fuku sauce.

A heavily-sauced burger on a piece of colorful paper
Buta Burger at FukuBurger.
Amelinda B Lee/Eater Vegas

Trattoria Nakamura-Ya

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Some of the best Japanese food in the city can be found inside Trattoria Nakamura-Ya. Here, chef Kengo Nakamura makes Tokyo-style wafu pasta. Before coming to the U.S., Nakamura cooked in Italian restaurants in Tokyo, making the style of spaghetti that originated in Japan during the American occupation of Japan post-WWII, melding Italian preparations with Japanese ingredients. Inside the Italian-Japanese restaurant, his bruschetta is topped with tuna and spicy cod roe, linguine is swirled in a sauce of creamy tomato and briny uni. And spaghetti is prepared with yolk-cream sauce and pancetta as well as salty seaweed, sweet clams, and aromatic Japanese basil.

Sparrow + Wolf

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Chef Brian Howard opened Sparrow & Wolf in 2017, in the early days of an ongoing trend in which on-Strip talent exits the casinos and strikes out on their own in Las Vegas neighborhoods. Emerging in a neighborhood best known for its exceptional Asian restaurants, the Chinatown bar and restaurant serves modern American fare that leans into the fine-dining techniques Howard picked up working in on-Strip restaurants like Comme Ça, Alizé, and Bouchon. Inside, servers flit around the dimly lit dining room ferrying dishes like oxtail hummus and tortellini birria drenched in goat consomme, as well as cocktails infused with brûléed pineapple or garnished with fried mushroom. And Howard’s take on the northern Vietnamese bánh cuốn, a dish of savory duck, fresh basil, and black rice roll, is at once sweet, spicy, and bright. Put your trust in the tasting menu, which opens with oysters and Japanese milk bread and ends with a chocolate espresso flan — each course paired with a wine from a small producer you’ve likely never heard of.

Partage

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Modern — and even modernist — French fare gets pride of place at Partage, a partnership from the French trio chef Yuri Szarzewski, pastry chef Vincent Pellerin, and manager Nicolas Kalpokdjian. Szarzewski’s three-, five-, and seven-course tasting menus rotate seasonally, but consistently offer dishes prepared with equal parts technique and whimsy. Duck breast is plated with vibrant yellow sweet potato puree, lobster carpaccio comes with a quenelle of icy mango sorbet, and high-pigment flavorful sauces color in the negative space between slices of white fish. 

A large piece of hamachi, topped with caviar and goldleaf, all sitting atop a white foam.
Hamachi marinated in kombu leaves at Partage.
Partage

Ichiza 1 Original

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This late-night izakaya hot spot begins with a feast for the eyes: concise descriptions of hamachi sashimi, bowls of udon noodles swirled in broth, and tangy fried chicken are scrawled onto pieces of paper in both Japanese and English and pasted above tables, around the bar, and behind the host stand. The specialties are listed along with reference photos and prices — usually around $3 to $7 — and span tender slices of raw fish from the restaurant’s sushi bar to heavier plates of smoky grilled squid, fluffy crab fried rice, and deep-fried agedashi tofu that go just right with a night of drinking. The move here is to order several dishes to share — evidenced by seating options that include a large communal table at the front and tatami floor-level seating at the rear for private groups. Save room for honey toast, an eye-catching loaf of toasted, buttered white bread with ice cream, fruit, and drizzles of thick honey. 

Chef Eyal Shani’s pita restaurant inside the Venetian Resort & Casino is unassuming at first glance. Tucked away in the shadow of Shani’s behemoth clubstaurant HaSalon, the quick-service restaurant with bartop seating offers a fairly tight menu of sandwiches and vegetable-centric sides — on a menu entirely written in Comic Sans font. Excellent sandwiches include the wild mushroom pita — described on the menu as “a whole forest burned on hot steel, scallions, sour cream, spicy” — and the rib eye minute steak slathered with tahini, tomato salsa, and spicy green peppers. Green beans are served cold and crunchy with olive oil, lemon, salt, and garlic and worth every one of the $11 they cost.

Pitas stuffed with vegetables Max Flatow Photography

Other Mama

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A killer raw bar and innovative cocktails greet diners at Other Mama on the west side across from Desert Breeze Park. The tight menu includes oyster specials, ceviches and sushi, and larger options like Japanese fried chicken, miso ribs, and kimchi fried rice, all served in a low-key setting with a bar overlooking the cooking action. The industry favorite restaurant offers a fairly modest interior, but the deviled eggs topped with crispy oysters and French toast caviar do all the heavy lifting.

Grilled octopus in a white bowl with a blue towel and wood table under.
Grilled octopus at Other Mama.
Louiie Victa/Eater Vegas

Ping Pang Pong

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The Gold Coast’s Ping Pang Pong is the gold standard for dim sum by day and Cantonese dishes by night. More than 80 dim sum dishes — spanning from a mango lobster and scallop roll to an aromatic bun with southern Canton five-spice duck — wheel through the dining room steamed, fried, or grilled from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. By night, smoked orange rib-eye steak cubes seared with peppercorn and toasted garlic and a Macanese crustacean claypot with a ginger laksa curry broth make the menu until 3 a.m. A Chinese pergola, Chinese lanterns overhead, and a host stand made from a Chinese apothecary cabinet add to the ambiance. Expect a wait or make a reservation in advance.

A selection of dumplings on small square plates, next to a teapot and a full cup of tea.
Dim sum at Ping Pang Pong.
Boyd Gaming

Stanton Social Prime Restaurant

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A celebration of all things maximalism, chef Chris Santos takes full advantage of the restaurant’s location next to the Omnia nightclub to turn the Las Vegas incarnation of his New York hotspot into a high-energy and luxurious night out. Flanked by mirrors and chandeliers, each dish is as much a joy to see on the table as it is to eat. There’s a Tomahawk steak that comes wheeled into the dining room suspended by fairy lights. French onion soup dumplings are drenched in a pool of melted gruyere in an escargot dish. And the desserts are often a fit for Is It Cake?

French Onion Soup Dumplings at Stanton Social Prime.
Stanton Social Prime Restaurant.
Caesars Entertainment

Restaurant Guy Savoy

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Though the aesthetic is more modern and there is a kitschy view of Vegas’s Eiffel Tower, the cuisine at Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace is identical to its Parisian counterpart. The most traditional — and pricey — presentations of French cooking are found here; the restaurant’s cellar contains more wine than the rest of the hotel combined. Must-orders include the artichoke soup with black truffles and Colors of Caviar arranged with caviar gelée at the bottom, a caviar cream in the middle and, on the top, pure caviar. Leave plenty of room for the bread cart.

A circle of lobster and a collection of small bites of vegetables on a cracker.
Restaurant Guy Savoy.
Restaurant Guy Savoy

No Pants at Absinthe

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No Pants is unexpected in a number of ways. The shipping container kitchen sits adjacent to the tent on Las Vegas Boulevard that hosts the Absinthe show. It offers just three menu items. And, while it’s effectively just a circus concession stand, it may serve the best burger on the Las Vegas Strip. A soft pretzel bun comes layered with two short rib blended brisket patties, smashed with grilled onions so that the edges are charred and caramelized, melted American cheese, tangy secret sauce, and a generous handful of thick-cut dill pickles. 

Two smash burgers.
No Pants.
Janna Karel

Lotus of Siam

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Revered Lotus of Siam serves chef and owner Saipan Chutima’s northern Thai cuisine, including a menu of Thai-style stews and coconut-less curries, all served with a spice level of 1 to 10. Diners should start with nam-prik-ong, a red chili dip, then try a roasted duck curry, garlic prawns, or thum-ka-noon with its mix of pork, jackfruit, tomato, and spices. The exceptional wine menu of sweet Gewürztraminers and Rieslings cut the heat. 

A soup, a noodle dish, and a bowl of rice on a basic wooden table.
Northern Thai dishes from Lotus of Siam.
Lotus of Siam

Shang Artisan Noodle

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Peek inside the open kitchen to watch as cooks at Shang Artisan Noodle meticulously knead, spin, and hand-pull tender and chewy noodles, boiling them for inclusion in pork and chicken broth with wontons and veggies or tossed in spicy soy sauce with mixed pork. The beef noodle soup with braised brisket is the crowd favorite here — rivaled only by the juicy and flavorful spicy wontons.

Shang Artisan Noodle
Shang Artisan Noodle.
Shang Artisan Noodle/Facebook

Vetri Cucina Las Vegas

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Following a two-year hiatus, chef Marc Vetri’s Vetri Cucina is again open atop the Palms Casino. It’s hard to rival the view that looks out over the Las Vegas Strip from the main dining room, but Vetri does so with just-made pastas like a silky chestnut fettuccine with boar ragu and cocoa, and entrees like supple roasted hen married with prosciutto and foie gras. The restaurant is small — just 75 seats — but charming and sunfilled, just right for dining on rustic Italian while live music plays.

Vetri Cucina
Vetri Cucina
Vetri Cucina

Le Cirque

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Watch the Fountains at Bellagio dance while you dine beneath the draped satin ceiling of Le Cirque. This award-winning French restaurant is helmed by chef Dameon Evers, whose tasting menus blend traditional French cooking with exciting flavors and striking presentations. The iconic lakeside restaurant, which debuted with Bellagio in 1998, refreshes its menu seasonally, with courses like Brittany loup de mer in leek fondue, wild risotto with sauteed chanterelle mushrooms, and seared foie gras with berries and pistachio.

é by José Andrés

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While José Andrés finally brought his divine tapas and paellas to Vegas, it’s é by José Andrés inside Jaleo at the Cosmopolitan that stands out for its creative tasting menu set before a vibrant red backdrop. Diners must make reservations far in advance to nab one of the eight seats for this exclusive multi-course meal. The menu, assembled in front of customers with tweezers and dry ice, changes constantly; one night may include scallop with black truffle, the next a literal bag of wild mushrooms, and another may feature foie gras encased in a cotton candy dumpling, a sprinkle doughnut or a slice of Wonder Bread.

A plaster hand holds a cotton candy at é by José Andrés
é by José Andrés.
Cosmopolitan

Bardot Brasserie

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Michael Mina’s French bistro inside Aria serves comfort food including loup de mer and black cod bouillabaisse in a handsome room with subway tiles and rich woods. Even the cocktails here tout the eccentricities of Paris, paying homage to the classics such as the Sidecar from Harry’s Bar and Serendipity from Bar Hemingway, all with their own twists. Brunch here — with dishes like garlicky escargot and croque madame — is also a must.

A spread of dishes, including a burger and baguette, at Bardot Brasserie
Bardot Brasserie
Bardot Brasserie

Carbone

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The Aria location of the decadent Italian-American restaurant Carbone features captains serving dishes tableside and seductive red velvet booths set in a circle so everyone has a view of the dining room drama. Lobster fra diavolo, chicken scarpariello, veal Parmesan, and spicy rigatoni are just some of the folkloric dishes here, but octopus pizzaiolo and pickled cauliflower are worth considering. Daring diners can put themselves in the captain’s hands ​​— that is, if money is no object.

A closeup of a seafood dish in a white bowl
Carbone.
MGM Resorts

Joël Robuchon

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Diners may sit next to Chuck Norris, one of the celebrity photos that line the opulently decorated space at the grand Joël Robuchon that feels like a cross between the inside of a Faberge egg and the boudoir of Marie Antoinette. The exquisitely crafted fare from Robuchon includes the 15-course degustation menu that is part French grandiosity, part Asian refinement. Truffled langoustine ravioli in a foie gras sauce, a semi-soft boiled egg on a spinach puree, and Maine lobster in a thinly sliced turnip join roving cheese, bread, and mignardises carts. 

Osetra caviar served atop a circle of king crab in a crustacean gelée surrounded by dots of cauliflower puree.
Le Caviar Imperial with Osetra caviar served atop king crab in a crustacean gelée dotted with cauliflower puree at Joël Robuchon.
MGM Resorts

Anima by EDO

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With a flair for the dramatic, chef and partner Oscar Amador has built a menu of inventive and playful dishes at this southwest Las Vegas restaurant. The team behind Edo Gastro Tapas and Wine harnesses flavors from Catalonia, Asia, Sicily, and beyond to prepare tapas like the Kaluga caviar and eggs, served inside eggshells, and the fig salad, arranged symmetrically with peach wedges and swirls of prosciutto, nestled among autumnal leaf-shaped wafers. Leave the decision-making to the kitchen and request the tasting menu.

Fig salad, arranged symmetrically with peach wedges and swirls of prosciutto.
Anima by EDO.
Janna Karel/Eater Vegas

Aroma Latin American Cocina

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Tucked away inside a strip mall in Henderson, this compact restaurant of just eight tables serves dishes influenced by the cuisines found in Guatemala, where Aroma chef Steve Kestler grew up, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela. In the open kitchen, Kestler, who previously worked at EDO Tapas & Wine and Bazaar Meat, prepares Guatemalan-style enchiladas that combine pickled beets, Kobe beef picadillo, and salty cotija cheese onto crunchy tostadas. Here, thick slabs of tender pork belly nestle into tacos with pico de gallo, pickled onions, and guacamole, while the Gaucho sandwich marries deftly grilled New York steak with a verdant chimichurri sauce. Altogether, Aroma marks an exciting entrant to Henderson’s casual dining scene, and with arguably some of the best tacos found in Southern Nevada, Aroma proves that Hendersonites need not travel far to find a stellar taco plate.

Carson Kitchen

In a modern restaurant with an al fresco rooftop and a rock and roll sensibility reminiscent of its founder, the late celebrity chef Kerry Simon, this downtown restaurant shakes up the menu seasonally, exploring new ways to play with comfort foods. Reliable mainstays include a cast iron skillet filled with sweet and smoky bacon jam and a slice of melted Havarti, ready to be scooped onto toasted slices of baguette. Perfectly cubed bites of pork belly are standouts in a pool of ocher buffalo sauce. And you can’t go wrong with the signature appetizer of crispy chicken skins with smoky honey.

Honey Salt

Honey Salt on the west side could pass for the dining room at restaurateur Elizabeth Blau and chef Kim Canteenwalla’s home with its comfort foods and relaxing decor. Known for its farm-to-table-inspired cooking, favorites here include the buttermilk fried chicken sandwich and bacon grilled cheese for lunch and banana foster french toast with almond granola and chocolate pearls for brunch. Stop in during happy hour, when the chicken sandwich is available as a slider for $6. 

A basket of fried chicken next to a bowl of mac ‘n’ cheese and a bowl of cole slaw.
Fried chicken at Honey Salt
Honey Salt/

Tacos El Gordo

If the lines outside Tacos El Gordo are any indication, the wildly popular tacos are still one of the can’t-miss experiences in Las Vegas. What the cafeteria-style restaurant lacks in ambiance, it more than makes up for in flavor. Each of the Tijuana-style tacos here is bursting with spice and texture. Arrive hungry and sample a few varieties, each about $3.50, by queueing separately for each kind of meat. In one line, order carne asada. In another, ask for extra pineapple to go with the al pastor. Mulas, with cheese melted between the taco’s two corn tortillas are also worth ordering. Bring cash for tipping both at the counter when orders are placed and when paying.

An array of tacos and drinks at Tacos El Gordo
Tacos El Gordo.
Tacos El Gordo

Esther's Kitchen

Esther’s Kitchen was one of the first successful restaurants to debut in the Las Vegas Arts District, hailing a new era for the neighborhood as a culinary destination. The Italian restaurant, named for chef and restaurateur James Trees’ great aunt Esther, is small but cozy, a frequent haunt among locals. You have to pay for the bread here — and for good reason. Trees’ sourdough loaves are hearty and crusty, just right for slathering with spreads like basil ricotta and delightfully salty anchovy butter. But the real draw is the pasta. Take the butternut squash tortellini, tossed with brown butter and a hint of espresso for a richness that just works. In a dish of pasta al zucco, pumpkin-shaped noodles scoop up spicy bites of pork sausage and broccoli rabe.